Mommy Monday

mommy monday

Yesterday at church, a sweet old lady that always sits behind us showed us something very special to her. It was a small notebook she bought back in the 50’s/60’s. Inside were quotes from her daughter when she was a toddler.

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She handed it over to Huff the Hubs and I and said, “I’ve been wanting to share this with you for a while. I love watching your children in church. I just wanted to pass on a little something if I could: write down what your kids say. They’re only little for a small amount of time and the things they say need to be treasured.”

I seriously thought I might cry!

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It reiterated to me that this was the best $13 I have ever spent:

my quotable kid

This book helps you document all the hilarious, sweet, and inappropriate things toddlers say so you can reminisce (and also embarrass your kids)!

I can’t wait to bring up this quote at Hermione’s 18th birthday:

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(In her defense, she had heard Momma say that a time or ten; breastfeeding can be rough, y’all!)

 

Do you write down your kids’ quotes? You should start now!

Mommy Monday

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A few days ago, while perusing Facebook, I came across this picture:
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And immediately I felt convicted. How many times do I find myself sitting at the table eating breakfast with Huff the Babe with my coffee in one hand and my phone in the other? Or lying on the floor scrolling through Pinterest while my daughter plays with her blocks?

I know that I can’t entertain my kid 24 hours a day, seven days a week. I know she needs time to play independently; that’s how creativity blooms and problem-solving skills emerge. But what about those times that she needs to feel engaged? Those times that she craves my attention–and needs it. Is she getting what she needs from me?

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I’ve done a “30-Day Digital Detox” before and it really helped my relationships and general mood. I think it’s time to bring that back. Only this time, it’ll be longer than 30 days. This time, it’ll be a lifestyle change.

I don’t want my kid to feel ignored. I want her to feel heard, loved, nurtured, and supported. I want her to know that she is more important to me than an electronic. I want her to know that I am here for her. Right now, she’s at the age that she’s absorbing EVERYTHING…the good and the bad.

Besides, if I put my phone down long enough, I can prevent episodes like this:

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Do you ever feel like you need to detox from your phone? Join me in putting the phone away! We can do it!

 

 

Writer Wednesday

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Happy Hump Day, writers!

Here’s today’s prompt:

What was an irrational fear you had as a child?

 

When I was a kid, one of my besties, Lisa, had a YMCA pass. She spent days with her grandma because her mother worked, so her grandma would take us to swim at the pool. I had never been to an indoor pool before this (most of the time I swam in my backyard or at the neighborhood outdoor pool) and was actually a little nervous.

After splashing around for a bit, a boy (a few years older than us) swam over to where Lisa and I were pretending to be mermaids (because, Ariel). “See that over there?” he asked, pointing to a grate at the bottom of the pool that I hadn’t noticed until then. “That’s where they let the sharks in when kids aren’t swimming.”

My heart dropped. Holy freaking crap, where did Lisa bring me?! I was going to get eaten by a shark and I’d never get to see what became of my beloved JTT on this season’s Home Improvement!

I immediately swam to the shallow end–far away from the death trap–and refused to move. What if the grate opened up and started chewing children left and right?! What if this was all a ruse and we weren’t really here to enjoy ourselves, but helpless pawns in the YMCA’s plan to feed their sea devils?

It wasn’t until I was in fifth or sixth grade that I started to realize sharks don’t live in public pools. Seriously. I blame that brat kid that fed me that terrifying lie for my aversion to sea animals. Makes me feel better about peeing in the pool he swam in. I hope he got a mouthful of my reconstituted Hawaiian Punch. Jerk.

 

 

 

What about you? What was an irrational fear you had as a kid?

Time Gone By…

I don’t know why, but here lately I’ve been feeling super nostalgic. Maybe it’s all the things from the 80’s and 90’s I’ve been seeing on Pinterest and Buzzfeed. Maybe it’s because I’m pregnant and really feeling like a “grown-up”; but I find myself constantly yearning for the days gone by.

 

The days before cell phones were in everybody’s pockets, when there was no Facebook, and social media meant passing notes in between classes.

 

I miss the days when the internet was new and people talked on the phone or *gasp* in person. But mostly I think I miss the days when we were so much more innocent.

 

Think about it. When I was in elementary school, there had not yet been a Columbine, the attacks on NYC or the Pentagon, and the biggest question on everyone’s mind was: “Are Ross and Rachel ever going to get together?!”

 

So in light of all my nostalgia, I give you the things I miss most about childhood:

 

1. The skating rink.

The club for underagers.

The club for underagers.

When I was a tween, the hottest place to go on Friday night was South Skate. I LOVED that place! Every Friday night, from 7-11 pm, me, my friends, and my sister were on 4 wheels. I had my first kiss at the skating rink, got my heart broken there, and was introduced to gloriously unhealthy mixture of cheese-from-a-can nachos (made with Doritos).

 

2. Cartoons.

I'm Buster Bunny. And I'm Babs Bunny. No relation.

I’m Buster Bunny. And I’m Babs Bunny. No relation.

Call me old fashioned, but I really don’t think that today’s cartoons are that funny. Honestly, I think they’re a little dumb. What happened to the intelligent cartoons like Tiny Toon Adventures, Animaniacs, and Batman: The Animated Series?

 

3. Electronics were not mainstream.

I can make you sound like a chipmunk with the press of a button.

I can make you sound like a chipmunk with the press of a button.

The closest thing I had to electronic devices was a Yak Bak and Casio My Magic Diary I got for my birthday when I was 11. We actually had to use our imaginations and we didn’t text—unless you include intricately folded handwritten notes.

 

4. Not having to make so many decisions.

Do I want to paint my nails or eat another Otter Pop...?

Do I want to paint my nails or eat another Otter Pop…?

Even though I wanted some independence, it was nice to not have to constantly know what was going on at a given time. I loved how freeing that felt. I didn’t have to worry about marking things on a calendar, making sure I was on time for an appointment, or checking that I bought a birthday present for someone. It was all done for me!

 

5. Knowing less about the world.

The more you know, the more you worry.

The more you know, the more you worry.

Yes, I know knowledge is power. But, sometimes, I wish I wasn’t so informed. Being overwhelmed with such a wealth of information can really grind on your joy. I hate when I turn on the television or pick up a magazine that its like an episode of Fear Factor. I feel like people in the media get together at night and say: “Okay, what can we totally blow out of proportion so people will freak out? *Maniacal laugh*”

When I was a kid, the only thing I wanted to know was if it was going to rain that day (meaning we’d have inside recess).

 

What about you? Do you miss the “good ole days”?