Her’s Day Thursday

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Just within the past few months, the Huffman Household has been taken over by everything American Girl. Huff the Tot first learned of these dolls through her cousin who had a few and started begging for one last summer. I was a little hesitant to purchase one (I mean, these dolls are crazy-expensive) but luckily, my sisters and mom went in together to snag one for HtT for Christmas. Since then, the girl has been OBSESSED. As I looked into the American Girl universe, I discovered there’s a lot more to it than just playing with dolls. Each doll has some historical significance (or a character attribute represented) and comes with a book telling that girl’s story. And, on New Year’s Day this year, AG revealed their “Girl of the Year” for 2018!

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Her name is Luciana Vega. She is a Chilean-American who has BIG aspirations to be the first person to walk on Mars! Luciana loves anything and everything to do with space and space exploration–she even goes to space camp! It makes my heart so happy to see such a diverse, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math)-loving gal in the AG lineup!

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American Girl has been working with several leading ladies over at NASA to make sure they got Luciana’s story right and showed girls out there that there are many women in this field. Former NASA chief scientist, Ellen Stofan, hopes that Luciana is a role model for girls to chase after STEM-related dreams and careers, saying: “I think a lot of girls are sometimes intimidated by STEM careers because they think they have to be perfect in math or the top of their class. But what you really need to have is determination, the spirit to pick yourself up when you make a mistake and keep going. I really think it’s that determination, that will, the ability to come back from failure, that are the most important characteristics. I hope that girls who read these books are inspired by these tales of failure but persistence.”

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Dream big, girls, and reach for the stars!

Her’s Day Thursday

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I’m always looking for books that I can read to Huff the Tot that show powerful/influential women in history, especially in the sciences and math. I was never into science or math growing up but I want HtT to know that she can do whatever she puts her mind to–including physics, calculus, and biology! I’ve found a few new books I’d like to add to our personal library!

Of Numbers and Stars: The Story of Hypatia

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This book is about a brilliant lady named Hypatia. She grew up in the city of Alexandria around 4 A.D. She was one of very few women of her time that was tutored in math and science, and even taught Socrates!

The Watcher: Jane Goodall’s Life with the Chimps

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This beautifully illustrated picture book tells the story of Jane Goodall. The book begins with her childhood and shows how Jane became enthralled with primates, dedicating her life to the study of chimps.

Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine

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I honestly do not know much about Ada Lovelace, so this book may make an appearance on Huff the Tot’s shelf! This book explains how Ada wrote the very first computer program in the 1840’s!

 

Look Up! Henrietta Leavitt, Pioneering Woman Astronomer

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Henrietta Leavitt was an astronomer that discovered the relation between the luminosity and the period of Cepheid variable stars. Because of her findings, astronomers are able to measure the distance between Earth and faraway galaxies!

 

Girls Who Looked Under Rocks: The Lives of Six Pioneering Naturalists

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This book features six amazing women who worked hard to preserve and understand the world around them. Girls Who Looked Under Rocks highlights women such as Rachel Carson and Maria Merian, intelligent, ground-breaking women who were able to break through a “men’s only” field and prove their intellectual prowess while making a positive impact on the environment.

 

Have you read any of these books? Do you have suggestions to add to this list? Share in the comments below!

 

 

 

Her’s Day Thursday

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As you know, I’m all about raising Huff the Tot to be a strong, independent girl (you know, until she decides to be “strong willed” in the cereal aisle of the grocery store-ha!) and I love having books around that can help get those values across. I stumbled upon some awesome books while perusing the interwebs this week and they were too great not to share!

 

Not All Princesses Dress In Pink 

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This book, written by Jane Yolen, let’s girls know that you can be any kind of princess you want! Want to be a princess that wears hockey uniforms? Do it! Are you a more traditional princess? Good for you! Like to breakdance while listening to classical music? Go, girl! Here’s an excerpt from this awesome book:

“Not all princesses dress in pink.
Some play in bright red socks that stink,
blue team jerseys that don’t quite fit,
accessorized with a baseball mitt,
and a sparkly crown!”

 

Stand Tall, Mary Lou Melon

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Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon tells the tale of little Molly Lou. She’s not like most people, but she’s okay with that! Her grandmother has taught her to be herself and be proud of who she is. But one day, Molly Lou starts a new school and there is a bully there determined to make Molly’s life miserable. But thankfully, our little heroine knows exactly what to do!

 

The Princess Knight

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“Violet is a young princess who wishes she could show the world that she is just as brave and strong as her brothers. But her strict father insists that she get married, and her brothers only mock her when she wants to be included in their fun. So Violet decides to use her intelligence and bravery to show everyone–once and for all–what she’s made of.”

 

Dangerously Ever After 

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The tag line alone is enough to hook a reader of any age: Not all princesses are made of sugar and spice–some are made of funnier, fiercer stuff.

 

Have you read any of these books? Do you have a favorite book you like to read to your little lady that promotes girl power? Share in the comments below!

Her’s Day Thursday

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Y’all know I’m all about empowering young women and girls to believe that they can be anything and do anything. I want to raise my daughter to shoot for the stars (same goes for her little brother) and to not let anyone say she (or he, in Indy’s case) can’t do anything (except skydiving; Momma won’t allow that. Sorry, kids.).

Because of this–and my love of documentaries–I have scoured Netflix and found some awesome documentaries and docu-series that highlight amazing women (as well as causes to help young women and girls) that are absolutely amazing!

Here’s my Top Four List of “You Go, Girl!” films on Netflix:

The Ascent of Woman 

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This four-part, BBC docu-series by Dr. Amanda Foreman explores women’s history in ancient civilizations, revolutionaries, and achievements of women throughout history.

 

The Women’s List 

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This film focuses on fifteen different women from different careers and their influences on women’s issues.

 

Warrior Women

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Warrior Women is an inside-look at some kick-a ladies from history that have become legends in their own right. From Joan of Arc to Mulan, host Lucy Lawless (AKA, Xena!) tells the stories of these BAMFs.

Girl Rising

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Y’all, this one is probably my favorite. This film focuses on nine different girls from various parts of the world and documents their triumphs and struggles. Its incredibly eye-opening!

 

What about you? What are some of your favorite “girl power” shows? Any of these make your list? Share in the comments below!

Her’s Day Thursday

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Today’s HDT cool chick is half my age but has already lived a lifetime!

 

Malala Yousafzai was born in July 1997 in Pakistan. At the time, her family ran a chain of schools in the region. When Malala was around 11 years old, she wrote a blog for the BBC that told all about her life under Taliban rule.

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She spoke of the terrorist group trying to take control of the area and the brutal treatment of women and those who would not comply to the Taliban’s orders. She frequently spoke out in favor of girl’s education and opposed the Taliban.

 

Malala gained more media attention as she participated in interviews and conferences. She was even nominated by Desmond Tutu for the International Children’s Peace Prize.

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On October 9, 2012, Malala got on her school bus to go home when a man also boarded the bus. He asked for Malala by name, pointed his gun at her, and fired three times. One bullet hit Malala on the left side of her forehead. She remained unconscious and in critical condition for days. When she improved, she was sent to England to receive care and rehabilitation.

 

Malala miraculously improved and got right back into her activism. She spoke in front of the United Nations in 2013, she spoke at Harvard University, and met the president, confronting him on his use of drone strikes in Pakistan. In July 2014, she talked at the Girl Summit in London, a conference that advocates rights for girls.

Malala Yousafzai, 16-year-old Pakistani campaigner for the education of women, speaks during a news conference with World Bank President Jim Yong Kim (not pictured), celebrating International Day of the Girl in Washington October 11, 2013. REUTERS/Gary Cameron

When Malala turned 17, she was co-awarded the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize (the youngest ever) for her resistance against the oppression of children and young people and for fighting for the right for all children to have an education. She shared the prize with a children’s rights activist from India.

 

A movie about her life, He Named Me Malala, is scheduled for release in the United States on October 2, 2015. Watch the trailer below!