Fan Girl Friday!

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This has been a rather stressful week. Between Huff the Tot getting sick and letting me and Huff the Hubs get ZERO sleep and HtH car breaking down, I’ve been on edge all week. But, HtT is feeling better, there’s chili in the crockpot, and I’ve got some aDORKable finds for you!

 

I LURVE Tsum Tsums. If you don’t know what they are, click here and get ready to squeal! They’re so cute! Now, get ready to squeal even MORE when you see that there are now Star Wars versions of the pint-size plushies!

Fan GIrl Friday Star Wars Tsum Tsums

Jabba the Hut and Boba Fett don’t look as menacing when they’re shrunk down and stuffed!

 

 

Scrolling through Pinterest is basically my favorite way to fall asleep and ever since we’ve bought our house, I’ve been looking at cool new ways to decorate. And after seeing this, I want to redo Hermione’s room!

Fan Girl Friday Dad builds fairytale room

A father built his little girl the ULTIMATE fairy tale bedroom! Check out that tree! The project took a little over 18 months and came with a bill near $5,000. Honestly, I think my dad could do this!

 

magazine has been posting awesome videos of actors and actresses performing scenes from popular/classic films and the results are AWESOME. In this video, Bradley Cooper and friends act out one of my favorite scenes from the movie Clueless!

I think Seth Rogen was my fave! They have other videos, including this one in which famous folks act out scenes from Gone With the Wind!

 

 

Have a fandom find you want to see highlighted on FGF? Share in the comments below or hit me up on Twitter!

 

 

Her’s Day Thursday

hersday thursday

Today’s HDT gal is actually one of my personal faves: Hattie McDaniel.

The name may not ring a bell, but the face surely will.

Hattie McDaniel

Hattie McDaniel was born in Kansas in 1895 to Henry, a Baptist preacher and Susan, a religious singer. Hattie was a natural performer and sang and danced with her older brother’s minstrel show. In 1925, Hattie got her big break by joinging the Melody Hounds—a touring ensemble—which turned into a career in radio.

In 1931, Hattie made her way to L.A. and got a few acting gigs here and there, but not enough to pay the bills. She made her way as a maid or washroom attendant.

Eventually, Hattie gained more and more roles in movies, acting alongside big names like Ginger Rogers, Henry Fonda, and Jimmy Stewart. She also became good friends with the leading man in the film Saratoga—the dashing Clark Gable.

In 1939, Hattie saw Mr. Gable again on the set of Gone With the Wind. Though some were against Hattie playing the character of “Mammy” in the David O. Selznick classic, she took on the role with fierce determination and, in this blogger’s opinion, lit up the screen.

The Academy of Motion Pictures also took notice, awarding McDaniel the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress. Because of unjust laws at the time, Hattie and her escort were sat far in the back of the ballroom, far from her Gone With the Wind costars. When Hattie accepted her award, however, she did so with grace and dignity:

Hattie Oscar

“Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, fellow members of the motion picture industry and honored guests: This is one of the happiest moments of my life, and I want to thank each one of you who had a part in selecting me for one of their awards, for your kindness. It has made me feel very, very humble; and I shall always hold it as a beacon for anything that I may be able to do in the future. I sincerely hope I shall always be a credit to my race and to the motion picture industry. My heart is too full to tell you just how I feel, and may I say thank you and God bless you.”

Hattie’s victories were not only limited to the Oscars. She also organized a group of African-Americans to fight against a homeowner’s group that were trying to keep blacks out of a prestigious Pasadena neighborhood. Hattie and her organization took their fight to the Supreme Court and won! In 1942, she purchased a beautiful two-story home in the Sugar Hill neighborhood and had yearly parties which her friend, Clark Gable, always attended.

Hattie volunteered for the USO, the American Women’s Voluntary Services, and organized a radio broadcast to raise money for the Red Cross.

Hattie’s acting career and philanthropic activities continued until her death in 1952. She leaves behind an amazing legacy and is a credit to her race and her gender.

Movies > Books?

This morning while simultaneously eating breakfast, checking my email, and pumping Hermione’s afternoon meal, I was watching The Today Show (I know, I’m a multi-tasking BOSS). Tamran, Natalie, and Willie were talking about a new study out of London that claims men prefer the movie adaptions of books while women prefer the novel itself.

True, for certain books I wholeheartedly prefer the books. There’s more detail, character development, and inner monologues that don’t always make it in their silver screen sisters. However, there are a few books that I would rather toss in the “donate” pile and pop in the DVD version. (I think I just heard the thud of a million bibliophiles falling to the ground.)

There aren’t many, but here are my film favorites that trump their paperback paramours:

 

The Great Gatsby 

Gatsby_1925_jacket

 

I know, I know…I’m committing literary blasphemy. I’m sorry; I’m just NOT a fan of this book. I found it difficult to read, difficult to follow, and I absolutely loathed every. single. character. No one had any redeeming qualities and everyone was bat-crap crazy. The movie, however, I loved!

gatsby

The first reason is obvious: Leo. But I enjoyed it more because it was able to show the scenery and the glitz and glamour of the 1920’s rather than describe it in dated, pseudo-intellectual language.

 

Beautiful Creatures

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I got this book as a Christmas gift and had never heard of it. I enjoyed the story; the premise wasn’t anything new (a girl has a supernatural power/family and struggles to deal) but the characters were charming and the setting was idyllic. There were many times though, that I thought: “Holy cow! Just wrap up a thought already! Move this bad boy along!” Needless to say, I got frustrated a lot. So i wasn’t too excited when I saw the movie.

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Then, my opinion changed. I absolutely loved the movie! It cut the fat (and trust me, there was a lot!) but stayed true to the integrity of the story.

 

 

Gone With the Wind

Gone_with_the_Wind_cover

I’ll admit: I haven’t actually read the entire book. I started reading it when I was about 13 years old (that may have been the problem) because I loved the movie growing up. My mom read the book, which led to my sisters reading (and loving) it as well. I tried, I really did. I just couldn’t get past the first chapter.

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The movie, on the other hand, is one of my favorite movies EVER. When I was little and my sisters and I would stay home from school sick, my mom would unfold the hide-a-bed from the brown and orange couch (everyone had one of those in the 80’s!), fix us some Jell-O, and we’d watch GWTW. Scarlett was just one of those characters that you love to hate and hate to love. She was fierce, conniving, and manipulative. But she was also sensitive, hard-working, and sentimental. An absolute gem of a film!

 

What about you? Any books you prefer in movie form?