Her’s Day Thursday

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Its been a while since I’ve written a Her’s Day Thursday post, and I promise you its been worth it! I’ve found some great books and toys to encourage your little lady to chase after her dreams, inspire her to create, and increase her self-confidence!

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This book by Ashley Rice is full of poems and mantras dedicated to helping your girl with confidence and motivation to chase after her dreams. Whether her dreams are to be a fashion designer or a firefighter, this book will pep talk her through it all!

 

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Is your daughter obsessed with building things? Or maybe she has an interest in all things STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) and you want to build on that passion (see what I did there?). Snag her this awesome set from K’Nex Mighty Makers! This set comes with 13 world landmark building ideas, as well as information about the landmarks and surrounding areas!

 

 

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This coloring book is not only a great way to get your gal off of screens, its an awesome tool to help start conversations about your child’s aspirations. According to Amazon, “This groundbreaking coloring book is all about building a girl’s confidence, imagination, and spirit! The 22+ coloring pages encourage girls to think beyond social conventions and inspire conversations with adults about what it really means to be confident, brave, and beautiful.” 

 

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Got a gamer gal on your hands? Teach her how to code with this Wonder Workshop Dash Robot! This little robot (who, for some reason, reminds me of The Pigeon) comes with an instruction/challenge booklet and is even compatible with Lego bricks and Lego Technic bricks! The possibilities are endless!

 

Do you own any of these? What does your fierce female think of them? Share in the comments below!

 

 

 

Her’s Day Thursday

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On Her’s Day Thursday, I highlight incredible women. And guess what? Today, I’m highlighting YOU. Yep, you, momma! The hard-working, diaper changing, soccer uniform washing, tear wiping, teenage sound board that is YOU. You are amazing!

So many times in this journey of motherhood, we get wrapped up in the stress, worry, and hardship. We think we’re not good enough and spend our evenings before we fall asleep telling ourselves we should’ve been more patient, should’ve read that fifth book, or should’ve allowed our teen to go to that party. We think we’re doing a terrible job and wonder what our kids think of us.

Your kiddos love you exactly as you are, where you are. They don’t care if you didn’t make a Pinterest-worthy snack for after tee ball. They don’t even notice if you haven’t lost the baby weight. And let me tell you that they probably rejoice when you’re too tired to cook and opt for pizza instead.

Don’t believe me? Check out this inspiring video from Care.com:

 

See yourself the way your kids do!

Her’s Day Thursday

Hers Day Thursday Girl

 

I thought I’d do something fun this week for Her’s Day Thursday and highlight some awesome goodies I found for the little lady in your life!

Have a pal that is expecting a wee woman? Or maybe there’s a fabulous female that’s turning one? These blocks are perfect!

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These Women Who Dared Blocks feature kick-a ladies from history such as: Cleopatra, Susan B. Anthony, and Harriet Tubman!

 

Have a little architect in your house? Spur her imagination on with this set of straws and connectors!

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Each set comes with 230 pieces to build forts, tents, boats–just about anything your girl can think of!

 

Huff the Tot must have a stack of books in her bed every night or the girl finds it impossible to go to sleep. I think she needs this nightshirt!

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Its perfect for your little bookworm!

 

Inspire your future CEO, president, mother, or writer with this poster full of wonderful women who rocked the world!

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This Women in History poster includes 13 women from history that did amazing things! The poster features Sacagewea, Queen Elizabeth I, and Anne Frank among others!

Her’s Day Thursday

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One of my goals this year is to blog more consistently. I’ve been failing on that front, especially with Her’s Day Thursday posts. I wanted to blog each week about a woman from every state in the U.S. So far this year I’ve hit Alabama and Alaska. Today, I’m getting back on the BAMF blogging wagon and telling you all about a great lady from Arizona: Jane H. Rider!

Jane H. Rider was born in 1889 to a homemaker mother and mining engineer father. From an early age, Jane was very interested in her father’s work. Her parents put education as a top priority and Jane was able to attend a private high school, later attending the University of Arizona. She graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in civil engineering—Arizona’s first female engineer.

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Her first position as a college graduate was as a bacteriologist for Arizona State Laboratories at the university she graduated from. She moved up the ladder, eventually becoming director of the lab in 1918! Her work included conducting surveys and investigations of the milk and water supplies throughout the state of Arizona. She’d collect samples by train, stagecoach, and even on horseback!

 

In a newspaper interview in 1966, Jane said this about her work: “In 1913, Arizona had the second highest infant mortality rate in the nation and a good share of the blame went to unsanitary milk,” she recalled in a newspaper interview in 1966. “Do you know what a ‘dobe hole is? When people built their adobe houses they dug the material out of the ground and left the hole. They let this fill with water to water their cattle. Then cows, on hot days, would stand in the ‘dobe hole. Then milking time came but the hossies were not washed off before they were milked, and the dirt and stagnant water got in the buckets.”

 

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Jane pushed for changes in the dairy industry, leading milk producers to pasteurize milk. She also tested foods and medicines for harmful products and worked to improve food products (and this was in the early 1900’s!).

 

Throughout her career, Jane received many awards and honors. She was accepted into the American Society of Civil Engineers, the National Society of Women Engineers, Distinguished Citizen Award from the University of Arizona, and Phoenix Woman of the Year in 1970.

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Jane H. Rider was a force to be reckoned with up until her death in 1981, fighting for cleaner water, food, and sanitary working conditions. A wonderful woman with a remarkable legacy!

Her’s Day Thursday

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Today’s Her’s Day Thursday star is one I’m sure hardly any of us have heard of but NEED to know about! Her name is: Alberta Schneck Adams.

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Alberta was born in Nome, Alaska to parents Albert and Mary. Albert was a veteran of World War I and was white, while Mary was of Inupiat heritage. During this time in Alaska, indigenous peoples faced harsh racism, much like the segregation of African Americans in the south. There were separate schools, eateries, and movie theaters for those of native tribal heritage. This did NOT sit well with Alberta, especially when she found herself on the enforcing side of this antiquated way of thinking.

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In 1944, Alberta worked as an usher at the Alaska Dream Theater in Nome. Her job was to make sure the only people who sat in the “whites only” section were indeed white. As you can imagine, this made her very uncomfortable. After all, Alberta was of Inupiat descent! She lodged a complaint to her manager and was quickly fired. Soon after her dismissal, Alberta returned to the movie theater with a white date. The two sat in the “whites only” section. When the manager demanded she and her date move to the non-white section, they stayed where they were. When the two refused to move, the manger called the police. Alberta was arrested and taken to jail to spend the night. When word of the incident reached the local Inupiat community, they rallied in support of Alberta and protested until she was released.

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After she was released, she wrote an article for the local paper, The Nome Nuggetstating:  “I only truthfully know that I am one of God’s children regardless of race, color or creed.” Alberta would not be stopped. She wrote a letter to the governor at the time, Ernest Gruening, and told him all about the incident. She knew she would gain his support for her cause because, just a year earlier, he had written a bill of his own that would end segregation in Alaska. Sadly, that bill had not made it through legislature. Renewed with fervor after Alberta’s stance, the governor reintroduced the bill–Alaska’s Anti-Discrimination Act–and it was signed into law on February 16, 1945!

Thank you, Alberta, for showing us that we CAN make a difference!

Her’s Day Thursday

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On Monday, we honored a man who had a lasting impact on the world. I’m not downplaying Martin Luther King Jr.’s peaceful fight for desegregation and civil rights, however I think it is just as important to talk about the woman who stood by his side throughout his battles for equality—Coretta Scott King.

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Coretta Scott was born in Marion, Alabama in 1927. Her grandmother, a former slave, was actually the midwife at her birth. Coretta was raised with her brothers and sisters in the segregated south. Coretta’s mother, Bernice, would bus her children as well as other black children in the neighborhood to the closest school—Lincoln Normal School.

 

Coretta excelled in academics as well as in the school (and church’s) choir and band in which she played the trumpet. She graduated valedictorian of her senior class in 1945 and attended Antioch College. At the time, Antioch was a historically all-white school and, in an effort to diversify, the college gave full scholarships to African-American students. Coretta’s sister was the first black student to attend Antioch just two years prior.

 

Because of her singing and musical prowess, Coretta was awarded a full scholarship to the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston. While at the Conservatory, Coretta was introduced to a young man—Martin Luther King Jr. At first, Coretta was not too keen on Martin; but, as she got to know him, Coretta fell for the future pastor and civil rights activist.

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The pair married in 1953. In 1954, after earning her degree in voice and violin from the New England Conservatory of Music, Coretta and her husband moved to Montgomery, Alabama where Martin became pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

 

Coretta gave up her dreams of a professional singing career and shifted her focus to the civil rights fight and assisting her husband in planning peaceful protests.

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In 1958, Coretta headlined a concert at a high school, singing songs about the fight to change legislation regarding segregation as well as break down the walls of racism. Coretta worked side by side with her husband until his untimely death in 1968. After Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, Coretta continued his work and his mission as long as she lived.

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Coretta Scott King endured her home being bombed, her husband being arrested several times, and numerous attempts by the FBI and other governmental offices to discredit herself, her husband, and their marriage, and she did it with grace and peace. Thank you, Coretta, for your lovely legacy and inspiring life story.

Her’s Day Thursday

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Just within the past few months, the Huffman Household has been taken over by everything American Girl. Huff the Tot first learned of these dolls through her cousin who had a few and started begging for one last summer. I was a little hesitant to purchase one (I mean, these dolls are crazy-expensive) but luckily, my sisters and mom went in together to snag one for HtT for Christmas. Since then, the girl has been OBSESSED. As I looked into the American Girl universe, I discovered there’s a lot more to it than just playing with dolls. Each doll has some historical significance (or a character attribute represented) and comes with a book telling that girl’s story. And, on New Year’s Day this year, AG revealed their “Girl of the Year” for 2018!

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Her name is Luciana Vega. She is a Chilean-American who has BIG aspirations to be the first person to walk on Mars! Luciana loves anything and everything to do with space and space exploration–she even goes to space camp! It makes my heart so happy to see such a diverse, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math)-loving gal in the AG lineup!

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American Girl has been working with several leading ladies over at NASA to make sure they got Luciana’s story right and showed girls out there that there are many women in this field. Former NASA chief scientist, Ellen Stofan, hopes that Luciana is a role model for girls to chase after STEM-related dreams and careers, saying: “I think a lot of girls are sometimes intimidated by STEM careers because they think they have to be perfect in math or the top of their class. But what you really need to have is determination, the spirit to pick yourself up when you make a mistake and keep going. I really think it’s that determination, that will, the ability to come back from failure, that are the most important characteristics. I hope that girls who read these books are inspired by these tales of failure but persistence.”

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Dream big, girls, and reach for the stars!