Her’s Day Thursday

Hers Day Thursday Girl

 

Its been a while since I’ve written a Her’s Day Thursday post, and I promise you its been worth it! I’ve found some great books and toys to encourage your little lady to chase after her dreams, inspire her to create, and increase her self-confidence!

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This book by Ashley Rice is full of poems and mantras dedicated to helping your girl with confidence and motivation to chase after her dreams. Whether her dreams are to be a fashion designer or a firefighter, this book will pep talk her through it all!

 

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Is your daughter obsessed with building things? Or maybe she has an interest in all things STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) and you want to build on that passion (see what I did there?). Snag her this awesome set from K’Nex Mighty Makers! This set comes with 13 world landmark building ideas, as well as information about the landmarks and surrounding areas!

 

 

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This coloring book is not only a great way to get your gal off of screens, its an awesome tool to help start conversations about your child’s aspirations. According to Amazon, “This groundbreaking coloring book is all about building a girl’s confidence, imagination, and spirit! The 22+ coloring pages encourage girls to think beyond social conventions and inspire conversations with adults about what it really means to be confident, brave, and beautiful.” 

 

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Got a gamer gal on your hands? Teach her how to code with this Wonder Workshop Dash Robot! This little robot (who, for some reason, reminds me of The Pigeon) comes with an instruction/challenge booklet and is even compatible with Lego bricks and Lego Technic bricks! The possibilities are endless!

 

Do you own any of these? What does your fierce female think of them? Share in the comments below!

 

 

 

Mommy Monday

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Hey, Momma! Looking for something to do with the kiddos this Independence Day that isn’t popping fireworks? I’ve rounded up some awesome American-themed activities (thanks, Pinterest!) to keep your kiddos busy and in the patriotic spirit!

Playdough to Plato has an amazing exploding pop rocket activity that’s not only fun, but also educational!

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I know some moms are 110% done with making slime, but for those of you that aren’t, check out this Star Spangled Slime from I Can Teach My Child!

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Summer is great time to do messy crafts outdoors! The kids get to go crazy and you don’t have to worry about cleaning up after them! This shaving cream firework craft (also from I Can Teach My Child) can be done in the backyard and then cleaned up with a run through the sprinkler! Everybody wins!

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Learning 4 Kids has an awesome way for kiddos that may not like the sound of firecrackers to still get in on the fun! Plus, you probably have all the necessary items already!

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Would you rather keep the festivities simple? Babies to Bookworms has a great list of Fourth of July books that will keep your kid’s attention and let them learn!

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Have you done any of these crafts? What’s your favorite way to spend the Fourth? Share in the comments below!

Her’s Day Thursday

Hers Day Thursday Girl

 

This week, I’ve found some awesome books and toys that will help your little lady become a strong woman!

 

For Your Teen (and you)! 

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This book covers an array of issues that teenage girls deal with today: body image, friends and bullies, divorce, and anxiety. According to the synopsis on Amazon, the author’s goal is to show young girls that they are stronger than they think and CAN overcome obstacles in their lives: Parents, schoolwork, boyfriends, college . . .it’s enough to make any teenage girl wish she could just snap her fingers and make it all go away. But with the click of her heels, she’ll soon discover that the means to dealing with stress were always within her power. Dealing with the Stuff That Makes Life Tough helps teenage girls find the wisdom within to overcome stress in their lives.

 

 

For Your Nature-Lover

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This activity pack comes with an activity journal full of outdoor and science activities! There’s even space for your little botanist to adopt a tree and track its progress for an entire year!

 

For Your Super Hero 

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It did my heart good to see so many little girls dressed up as super heroes this Halloween! I can’t even tell you how many little Wonder Women  I saw out trick-or-treating because I lost count! Give your little hero a pal to snuggle with and someone to tag along on her amazing adventures! Get it here!

 

For Your Activist in Training

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This board book is full of amazing women throughout history and modern time that have influenced change for the better! This Little Trailblazer features Rosa Parks, Maria Tallchief, Malala Yousafzai, and Florence Nightingale (among others)! A definite must-read for your little revolutionary!

 

 

Her’s Day Thursday

 

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During the Oscars this past Sunday, GE debuted an awesome new commercial. Didn’t see it? No worries! I’ve got it right here:

 

I. LOVE. THIS.

(Also, the irony that this commercial was played during an awards show honoring celebrities was not lost on me)

I wish great women like Millie Dresselhaus were held to the same esteem as celebrities. And Millie deserves it! She was the first female professor at MIT (she taught physics and electrical engineering) and has won several awards including the Presidential Medal of Freedom and the National Medal of Science (among more than a dozen others)!

You can learn more about Millie here!

Her’s Day Thursday

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If you’ve read my blog at all, you know that I love to write about strong women. Especially strong women that have paved the way for future generations in lines of work that are predominantly male. So when I saw this trailer, I literally got goosebumps!

 

 

The film, Hidden Figures, tells the story of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn, and Mary Jackson (a physicist, space scientist, and mathematician, respectively); three incredible women who used their brain power to help the Project Mercury mission (aka, the mission in which John Glenn orbited the Earth)  a success. Not only did these women break massive ground for women in STEM fields, but also for women of color.

(The film is actually an adaption of a book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly. Read more about it here!)

 

 

 

 

Her’s Day Thursday

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I’m super excited about today’s leading lady! I’ve been wanting to write about her for a while, but I also know she’s more well-known than others, and I’ve been wanting to highlight some ladies you may not have known about. But this woman is just too great NOT to write about! Today’s Her’s Day Thursday BAMF is: Marie Curie.

 

Marie Skłodowska (Curie) was born in 1867 in Warsaw, Poland to a family that had recently lost all of its fortune. Though many thought she and her siblings were doomed to live an impoverished life, Marie worked hard on her education. She attended a boarding school at the age of ten, having been taught by tutors until then. When she was older, she and her sister began their advanced studies at the Flying University—the only university that admitted female students in Warsaw.

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Marie and her sister travelled to Paris in 1891 and enrolled at the University of Paris. Marie studied during the day and tutored students at night as a way to keep herself financially afloat. She earned a degree in physics in 1893 and continued her education, earning a second degree in 1894.

 

Marie began research into the properties of different kinds of steels and needed a laboratory to work. A fellow physicist introduced her to Pierre Curie, another scientist who had access to a large laboratory. Pierre allowed Marie to conduct her research at his lab and the two soon fell in love and married.

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Marie went on to earn her PhD and became the first female professor at the University of Paris. Marie’s research continued as she discovered two elements: polonium and radium. She also coined the term “radioactivity” and found the methods for isolating radioactive isotopes.

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She was awarded not one but two Nobel Prizes; once for physics in 1903 (which she shared with her husband and another physicist) and again for chemistry in 1911.

 

During World War I, Marie saw the need for mobile x-ray units to help doctors and battlefield surgeons on the front lines. She was soon appointed director of the Red Cross Radiology Service and trained other women to serve as aides. She also produced needles containing radon to use for sterilizing infected tissue.

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During the war, Marie’s research went on the backburner. However, after the war, she continued her humanitarian work as well as her research. Marie Curie died in 1934, due to aplastic anemia—contracted from her exposure to radium over many, many years. The dangers of radium were unknown at the time, and Marie would carry test tubes of it in her pocket and leave it in her desk drawers. Even today some of Marie’s personal papers and belongings are considered dangerous because of the high levels of radioactivity.

 

Marie Curie was an innovator, a determined woman, and a scientist. Her legacy still lives on today.

Her’s Day Thursday

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Earlier this week, I opened my browser and saw the CUTEST Google Doodle:

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The doodle was for Sally Ride‘s birthday and I thought, “Hey! Now I have my Her’s Day Thursday lady!”

Sally Kristen Ride was was born on May 26, 1951 in Los Angeles, CA to a women’s correctional facility counselor and a political science professor. Sally always had a heart for science and earned her bachelor’s degree (and later her master’s and Ph.D.) in English and Physics.

In 1978, Sally saw an advertisement in the Stanford school newspaper seeking people for the space program. Sally was one of 8,000 applicants and was chosen to join NASA as an astronaut.

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Being the first female astronaut, Sally faced a lot of scrutiny. During a press conference before her first space flight in 1983, Ride was asked, “Do you weep when things go wrong on the job?” (Really? Really?) But Sally faced it with grace. She went on to totally rock her position aboard the Challenger and became the first American woman in space, the first woman to use the robot arm in space, AND the first woman to use the robot arm to retrieve a satellite! (Take that, Howard Wolowitz!)

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Before her third mission, tragedy struck close to Ride. The Challenger exploded shortly after takeoff in 1986. After that, Ride was stationed in Washington D.C., and appointed to a presidential committee that investigated the disaster. Ride went on to found NASA’s Office of Exploration.

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In 2003, Sally founded Sally Ride Science, an organization that produces science entertainment and publications to help get middle and high school students (especially girls) excited about science!

Sadly, Sally passed in 2012, less than two years after receiving a pancreatic cancer diagnosis. Though she is gone, her legacy will live on and inspire young girls to believe in their dreams and keep shooting for the stars!

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