Her’s Day Thursday

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Though it is very historic that, this year, a woman has become her party’s candidate for the presidential election, another woman holds the title of first woman to run for President of the United States. That distinction goes to today’s leading lady: Victoria Claflin Woodhull.

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Victoria was born in 1838 in rural Ohio, the seventh of ten children, to Roxanna and Reuben Claflin. Her mother was illiterate and her father was an abusive con man, making his money as a snake oil salesman. When she was just a few days past her fifteenth birthday, Victoria married her first husband with whom she had two children. She later divorced him, finding out he was an alcoholic and womanizer. Back in the 1850’s, divorce was scandalous and was much stigmatized for the woman. This catapulted Victoria into becoming a voice for women who were forced to stay in loveless and often abusive marriages.

Victoria began working to support herself and her children as well as fighting for women’s rights. She and her sister, Tennessee, became the first female stock brokers in 1870, and opened their own firm. Victoria ended up making a fortune on stocks and helped Cornelius Vanderbilt make his millions.

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Victoria decided to amp up her fight to gain the right to vote for herself and all American women. She testified before a House Judiciary Committee and argued that the 14th and 15th Amendments already gave women the power to vote, they just needed to act on it. She pointed out that the Amendments protected the right to vote for all citizens. After this, Victoria was sought out by Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Isabella Beecher Hooker to become a part of their movement that was gaining momentum.

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That same year, Victoria and her sister founded a newspaper—Woodhull and Claflin’s Weekly. Most of the articles focused on women’s issues of the day such as suffrage and women’s education. However, it has become best known for exposing the hypocrisy of Pastor Henry Ward Beecher who preached fidelity in his masses, but was secretly having an affair with a church member. The article prompted criminal charges to be filed against Beecher and a trial (which ended in a hung jury) soon followed.

Victoria was nominated for president in 1872 by the Equal Rights Party, with Frederick Douglass named as her running mate. (Douglass never commented on the nomination.) Victoria and her sister were arrested the day before the election for “publishing an obscene newspaper” because of the story on Beecher’s affair. They were held for a month in jail, thus preventing Victoria from attempting to vote in the election. Unshaken, Victoria continued her fight for women’s equality and ran for president years later in 1884 and 1892.

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Victoria fought for women and for their voices to be heard until her dying day. She truly has earned the title of Kick-A Woman in History!

Her’s Day Thursday

Her's Day Thursday3

 

If you’ve read my blog at all, you know that I love to write about strong women. Especially strong women that have paved the way for future generations in lines of work that are predominantly male. So when I saw this trailer, I literally got goosebumps!

 

 

The film, Hidden Figures, tells the story of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn, and Mary Jackson (a physicist, space scientist, and mathematician, respectively); three incredible women who used their brain power to help the Project Mercury mission (aka, the mission in which John Glenn orbited the Earth)  a success. Not only did these women break massive ground for women in STEM fields, but also for women of color.

(The film is actually an adaption of a book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly. Read more about it here!)

 

 

 

 

Her’s Day Thursday

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In keeping with last week’s post about some lovely young ladies competing for Team USA in the Rio Olympics. Today, I want to tell y’all about some awesome women that aren’t letting age stop them from achieving Olympic greatness!

Kristin Armstrong

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This week, Kristin Armstrong took home her third iOlympic gold medal in the women’s individual time trial (cycling) the day before her 43rd birthday! She battled through a nosebleed and osteoarthritis in BOTH hips! What a BAMF!

 

Oksana Chusovitina

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Oksana has been comepeting in the Olympics for more than 25 years! She is proof that hard work pays off if you stick with it! Just check her out:

 

Kim Rhode

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Kim Rhode has been competing in the skeet shoot and double trap shooting since she was 13 years old! She’s been competing in the Olympics for TWENTY years and, while in Rio this year, became the first U.S. Olympian to qualify for an Olympic team on FIVE different continents! What a sharp shooter!

 

These ladies prove age is just a number!

Her’s Day Thursday

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Women’s Equality Day was yesterday, celebrating the anniversary of the day women earned the right to vote back on August 26, 1920. You know who we have to thank for that? These women!

Susan B. Anthony

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A leader in the suffragist movement, Susan fought hard for women’s rights as well as the abolition of slavery.

 

Antoinette Brown Blackwell

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Antoinette was a co-founder of the American Woman Suffrage Association!

 

Lillian Feickert

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Lillian served as the President of the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association and later ran for Congress!

 

True, we have come a long way from organizing petitions and handing out leaflets to promote the right to vote for women. However, this infographic from Time.com shows we still have a ways to go, especially with getting more women involved in government. So let’s encourage each other, fellow ladies, and those young women coming up after us to pursue our dreams, reach for the stars, and know that we can be absolutely ANYTHING we want to be and make a difference for the better in this world!

Her’s Day Thursday

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Today’s HDT cool chick is half my age but has already lived a lifetime!

 

Malala Yousafzai was born in July 1997 in Pakistan. At the time, her family ran a chain of schools in the region. When Malala was around 11 years old, she wrote a blog for the BBC that told all about her life under Taliban rule.

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She spoke of the terrorist group trying to take control of the area and the brutal treatment of women and those who would not comply to the Taliban’s orders. She frequently spoke out in favor of girl’s education and opposed the Taliban.

 

Malala gained more media attention as she participated in interviews and conferences. She was even nominated by Desmond Tutu for the International Children’s Peace Prize.

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On October 9, 2012, Malala got on her school bus to go home when a man also boarded the bus. He asked for Malala by name, pointed his gun at her, and fired three times. One bullet hit Malala on the left side of her forehead. She remained unconscious and in critical condition for days. When she improved, she was sent to England to receive care and rehabilitation.

 

Malala miraculously improved and got right back into her activism. She spoke in front of the United Nations in 2013, she spoke at Harvard University, and met the president, confronting him on his use of drone strikes in Pakistan. In July 2014, she talked at the Girl Summit in London, a conference that advocates rights for girls.

Malala Yousafzai, 16-year-old Pakistani campaigner for the education of women, speaks during a news conference with World Bank President Jim Yong Kim (not pictured), celebrating International Day of the Girl in Washington October 11, 2013. REUTERS/Gary Cameron

When Malala turned 17, she was co-awarded the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize (the youngest ever) for her resistance against the oppression of children and young people and for fighting for the right for all children to have an education. She shared the prize with a children’s rights activist from India.

 

A movie about her life, He Named Me Malala, is scheduled for release in the United States on October 2, 2015. Watch the trailer below!

Her’s Day Thursday

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We’ve been seeing a lot of support for women’s rights in the news lately. From Emma Watson’s speeches to Meryl Streep’s emphatic fist bump during Patricia Arquette’s Oscar acceptance to Reese Witherspoon’s #AskHerMore campaign, we see celebrities bringing the female fight to the forefront.

Another cause that’s gaining steam is the “Women on 20’s” campaign. A non-profit group has compiled a list of women they would like to see replace Andrew Jackson on the twenty dollar bill in time for the 100th anniversary (the year 2020) of the Constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote.

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Over 256K votes have been cast since mid-March and the list has been trimmed to four contenders: Eleanor Roosevelt, Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, and Wilma Mankiller. The group hopes to garner enough public support to push this through to the President. Help out by casting a vote for your favorite lady here! Voting closes at 11:59 p.m. ET on Mother’s Day, May 10, 2015, so get to it!

Personally, I’d LOVE to see Wilma Mankiller on the $20 bill! But I’m a little partial to a fellow Okie! Go vote, people!