Her’s Day Thursday

Hers Day Thursday Girl

 

This week, I’ve found some awesome books and toys that will help your little lady become a strong woman!

 

For Your Teen (and you)! 

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This book covers an array of issues that teenage girls deal with today: body image, friends and bullies, divorce, and anxiety. According to the synopsis on Amazon, the author’s goal is to show young girls that they are stronger than they think and CAN overcome obstacles in their lives: Parents, schoolwork, boyfriends, college . . .it’s enough to make any teenage girl wish she could just snap her fingers and make it all go away. But with the click of her heels, she’ll soon discover that the means to dealing with stress were always within her power. Dealing with the Stuff That Makes Life Tough helps teenage girls find the wisdom within to overcome stress in their lives.

 

 

For Your Nature-Lover

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This activity pack comes with an activity journal full of outdoor and science activities! There’s even space for your little botanist to adopt a tree and track its progress for an entire year!

 

For Your Super Hero 

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It did my heart good to see so many little girls dressed up as super heroes this Halloween! I can’t even tell you how many little Wonder Women  I saw out trick-or-treating because I lost count! Give your little hero a pal to snuggle with and someone to tag along on her amazing adventures! Get it here!

 

For Your Activist in Training

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This board book is full of amazing women throughout history and modern time that have influenced change for the better! This Little Trailblazer features Rosa Parks, Maria Tallchief, Malala Yousafzai, and Florence Nightingale (among others)! A definite must-read for your little revolutionary!

 

 

Her’s Day Thursday

Hers Day Thursday Girl

 

The other night, I was watching PBS (big shocker; that’s my nightly ritual. Yes, I’m basically an 80-year-old in a 32 year old’s body) and there was a special about a woman named Lydia Mendoza.

Lydia or, “La Alondra de la Frontera,” (The Lark of the Border) was born in Houston, Texas in May 1916. Her parents were very musical–her mother and grandmother actually taught her how to play guitar when she was a toddler! When Lydia was just four years old, she built her own guitar out of wood, nails, and rubber bands. Lydia and her sister performed with her parents in a family band named La Cuarteto Carta Blanca on the streets of Houston. One day, Lydia’s father found an ad in a local Spanish newspaper, looking for musical acts. The family performed and won the chance to travel to San Antonio to record for the Okeh record label.

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Not long after, Lydia and her family moved to Michigan as migrant workers. They quickly built up a large fan base within their migrant community, with Lydia shining bright. The Mendoza family eventually moved back to San Antonio and resumed performing. In the early 1930’s, Manuel Cortez (a pioneer in Mexican-American broadcasting) saw Lydia perform and was immediately taken by her talent. He signed her and she recorded her first single, Mal Hombre. It was an instant success! Lydia toured the country with her family in tow.

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Lydia accomplished great success in her career which spanned over 60 years, 50 records, and more than 200 songs. Her soulful style, 12-stringed guitar, and ability to write deep, meaningful songs has made her a pioneer and a legend within the Spanish-speaking music community. Lydia continued to perform–even playing at Jimmy Carter’s inauguration–and tour until she suffered a stroke in 1998. She has received numerous awards and acknowledgements: the National Heritage Fellowship Lifetime Achievement Award, the National Medal of Arts, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from Folk Alliance International. And, in 2013, Lydia was honored with a commemorative stamp from the United Postal Service.

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Gracias, Lydia, for your beautiful voice and amazing legacy!

Her’s Day Thursday

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The other night, I was watching PBS (a nightly ritual before I go to bed…sheesh, how old am I?!) and a local program came on, highlighting influential women in history that were from Oklahoma. One of them was Kate Barnard.

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Catherine Ann “Kate” Barnard was born in Geneva, Nebraska in 1875. After her mother passed away when she was little, her father sent her to live with relatives and he joined the Land Run in Oklahoma. After staking his claim, Kate journeyed to Oklahoma to live with her father. In 1895, she attended a Catholic school and earned a teaching certificate, teaching until 1902.

When she quit teaching, Kate took a business course and became a secretary for the territorial legislature. She was chosen to represent Oklahoma at the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904. It was there that she met Jane Addams and other social reformers. This was the first time Kate had been exposed to city life, and experienced first-hand the slums and terrible living conditions the poor had to endure. When she returned to Oklahoma, she was determined to help bring about social change.

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She threw herself into aid and charity work, participating in Farm Labor meetings and even being elected the Charities and Corrections Commissioner. Through her appointment, she enacted essential education laws, helped create programs to support poor widows, and a state ban on child labor. Kate also advocated for safe working conditions and the eradication of “blacklisting” union members. She was also a voice for abused Native American children. Through her incredible speeches, she was able to convince politicians that there was a deep need to increase federal protection for members of the Five Tribes. Her most notable achievement has been noted as uncovering the abuse of Oklahoma prisoners being held in Kansas. Kate discovered the prisoners were being subjected to torture and forced labor in coal mines. Because of her findings, it forced the governor to return the prisoners to Oklahoma and resulted in the building of the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlister.

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Kate’s political career ended during her second term in office. She fought so diligently for the needs of Native Americans who were being cheated out of their land. Because of her devotion to righting this wrong, she made many enemies, including William H. Murray who convinced the state legislature to defund her office. In her book, A Chief and Her People, Wilma Mankiller quoted Kate: “I have been compelled to see orphans robbed, starved, and burned for money. I have named the men and accused them and furnished the records and affidavits to convict them, but with no result. I decided long ago that Oklahoma had no citizen who cared whether or not an orphan is robbed or starved or killed – because his dead claim is easier to handle than if he were alive.”

Kate died in 1930, due to many lingering health problems and was inducted into the Oklahoma Women’s Hall of Fame in 1982.

Thank you, Kate, for your amazing work for Oklahoma!

 

 

 

 

 

Her’s Day Thursday

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I’m always looking for books that I can read to Huff the Tot that show powerful/influential women in history, especially in the sciences and math. I was never into science or math growing up but I want HtT to know that she can do whatever she puts her mind to–including physics, calculus, and biology! I’ve found a few new books I’d like to add to our personal library!

Of Numbers and Stars: The Story of Hypatia

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This book is about a brilliant lady named Hypatia. She grew up in the city of Alexandria around 4 A.D. She was one of very few women of her time that was tutored in math and science, and even taught Socrates!

The Watcher: Jane Goodall’s Life with the Chimps

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This beautifully illustrated picture book tells the story of Jane Goodall. The book begins with her childhood and shows how Jane became enthralled with primates, dedicating her life to the study of chimps.

Ada Byron Lovelace and the Thinking Machine

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I honestly do not know much about Ada Lovelace, so this book may make an appearance on Huff the Tot’s shelf! This book explains how Ada wrote the very first computer program in the 1840’s!

 

Look Up! Henrietta Leavitt, Pioneering Woman Astronomer

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Henrietta Leavitt was an astronomer that discovered the relation between the luminosity and the period of Cepheid variable stars. Because of her findings, astronomers are able to measure the distance between Earth and faraway galaxies!

 

Girls Who Looked Under Rocks: The Lives of Six Pioneering Naturalists

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This book features six amazing women who worked hard to preserve and understand the world around them. Girls Who Looked Under Rocks highlights women such as Rachel Carson and Maria Merian, intelligent, ground-breaking women who were able to break through a “men’s only” field and prove their intellectual prowess while making a positive impact on the environment.

 

Have you read any of these books? Do you have suggestions to add to this list? Share in the comments below!

 

 

 

Her’s Day Thursday

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Though it is very historic that, this year, a woman has become her party’s candidate for the presidential election, another woman holds the title of first woman to run for President of the United States. That distinction goes to today’s leading lady: Victoria Claflin Woodhull.

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Victoria was born in 1838 in rural Ohio, the seventh of ten children, to Roxanna and Reuben Claflin. Her mother was illiterate and her father was an abusive con man, making his money as a snake oil salesman. When she was just a few days past her fifteenth birthday, Victoria married her first husband with whom she had two children. She later divorced him, finding out he was an alcoholic and womanizer. Back in the 1850’s, divorce was scandalous and was much stigmatized for the woman. This catapulted Victoria into becoming a voice for women who were forced to stay in loveless and often abusive marriages.

Victoria began working to support herself and her children as well as fighting for women’s rights. She and her sister, Tennessee, became the first female stock brokers in 1870, and opened their own firm. Victoria ended up making a fortune on stocks and helped Cornelius Vanderbilt make his millions.

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Victoria decided to amp up her fight to gain the right to vote for herself and all American women. She testified before a House Judiciary Committee and argued that the 14th and 15th Amendments already gave women the power to vote, they just needed to act on it. She pointed out that the Amendments protected the right to vote for all citizens. After this, Victoria was sought out by Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Isabella Beecher Hooker to become a part of their movement that was gaining momentum.

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That same year, Victoria and her sister founded a newspaper—Woodhull and Claflin’s Weekly. Most of the articles focused on women’s issues of the day such as suffrage and women’s education. However, it has become best known for exposing the hypocrisy of Pastor Henry Ward Beecher who preached fidelity in his masses, but was secretly having an affair with a church member. The article prompted criminal charges to be filed against Beecher and a trial (which ended in a hung jury) soon followed.

Victoria was nominated for president in 1872 by the Equal Rights Party, with Frederick Douglass named as her running mate. (Douglass never commented on the nomination.) Victoria and her sister were arrested the day before the election for “publishing an obscene newspaper” because of the story on Beecher’s affair. They were held for a month in jail, thus preventing Victoria from attempting to vote in the election. Unshaken, Victoria continued her fight for women’s equality and ran for president years later in 1884 and 1892.

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Victoria fought for women and for their voices to be heard until her dying day. She truly has earned the title of Kick-A Woman in History!

Her’s Day Thursday

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Since October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, I thought I’d shake things up a bit here on Her’s Day Thursday!

According to a new study, about 1 in every 8 women with develop breast cancer in their lifetime. Not only do the patients have to deal with the physical, emotional, and mental effects this disease has on a person, but also the financial burden that it brings. Treatments can range from several hundred a month to the tens of thousands. This is a lot for a family to handle, especially when they are trying to be strong and supportive for one another. Thankfully, there’s help! And YOU can get in on the action!

Miles of Hope

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If you’re in the New York area and need assistance, Miles of Hope is there for you. According to their site, their mission is: “To fund support services and outreach for people affected by breast cancer within the eight counties of the Hudson Valley, New York (Columbia County, Dutchess County, Putnam County, Westchester County, Rockland County, Orange County, Ulster County and Greene County).”

 

The Pink Fund

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The Pink Fund helps cancer patients all over the country with financial as well as legal professional assistance (learn more at https://mesotheliomaexplained.com/mesothelioma-lawyers/) as they go their their treatments and recovery. You can also get in on the action and donate! If you don’t have the financial means to give, they are always looking for people to donate their time as well!

 

 

Pantene Beautiful Lengths

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Breast cancer treatments can not only be hard on the body, mind, and finances, but also to the self-esteem of a woman or girl that is dealing with the loss of their hair do to chemotherapy. I absolutely love Pantene’s Beautiful Lengths charity that gives real-hair wigs to those in need FREE of charge! (My sister and I have donated hair to them and it was an awesome experience!)

 

Do you know of a charity that helps breast cancer patients? Share in the comments below!

 

Her’s Day Thursday

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A few weeks ago, huff the Hubs and I watched an interesting docu-series on life in the 1960’s. While watching, we learned about an awesome lady named Rachel Carson. I didn’t know anything about her until this documentary and quickly decided that EVERYONE needed to know about this wonderful woman!

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Rachel Carson was born on May 27, 1907, near Springdale, Pennsylvania. As a child, Rachel loved to read; mostly stories about the natural world and animals. Being inspired, she wrote stories while playing on her family’s farm.

When Rachel graduated high school, she studied at the Pennsylvania College for Women; first as an English major, but quickly changed to biology. While at PCW, she kept up her love of writing and wrote for the school newspaper.

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She was admitted to Johns Hopkins University for their graduate program, but had to stay in Pennsylvania because of financial problems. Soon, however, she was able to transfer to Johns Hopkins and earned a masters in zoology. After earning her degree, tragedy struck and Carson had to care for her family after her father died. She took a position with the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries and wrote copy for a radio program designed to garner the public’s interest in wildlife.

Her boss loved her work and, in 1936, she was given a position as a junior aquatic biologist (only the second woman at the time). Carson continued her work and research, writing several books about wildlife and nature. In 1962, however, her most well-known book, Silver Spring was published.

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Silver Spring was an investigation into the harmful affects of pesticides used on crops and the environment. Her book was the catalyst to the modern environmental movement and helped speed up the outlawing of DDT.

Though she was met with criticism and push-back (mostly from chemical companies and those lawmakers in their pockets) Carson didn’t waiver. She continued to find more and more research showing just how harmful these chemicals were.

Carson passed away in 1964. Six years later, under President Nixon’s administration, the Environmental Protection Agency was created; many credit Carson’s work to its creation. During President Jimmy Carter’s time in office, he awarded Carson the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

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Thanks, Rachel, for helping to protect our environment and our food!